Cold Brew S Filter Iced Coffee in 10 Pictures

It's officially the dog days of August and the US weather forecast looks like it's been cooked in an oven WAY too long:

Map via accuweather.com, temps courtesy of Earth's tilt on it's axis.

Map via accuweather.com, temps courtesy of Earth's tilt on it's axis.

If it's too hot to boil water for coffee, cold brew is the answer. The nice thing about cold brew is the convenience: grab a pick me up out of the fridge any time you feel like it's just a little too hot (or in the morning if you don't feel like boiling water since it's already 90 out).

Here's how you do it in 10 easy pictures:

Pickle jar for brewing (always recycle!) plus coffee, water and stir stick.

Pickle jar for brewing (always recycle!) plus coffee, water and stir stick.

Step 1: Add a bunch of cold water to some coarsely ground coffee. Use about double your normal coffee ratio. We used a ratio of 1:7 for this post and it worked great. For the detail oriented that's 100 grams of coffee or about 6 AeroPress scoops of ground coffee. We used 700 grams of water, or almost 3 cups of water. This will look like way too much coffee for the water, but that's ok. It's supposed to be a coffee concentrate and you can always dilute it after brewing!

Here's what the coffee looks like in a big pickle jar:

Notice the pretty glass, and how coarse the grind is...

Notice the pretty glass, and how coarse the grind is...

Step 2: Add the water to the coffee (duh!). Do it slowly and stir it in as you go so the coffee mixes well.

That white stuff at the top of the brew is mostly carbon dioxide. When it releases it increases the solubility of the grounds. In non-chemistry terms: it's a good thing because when the coffee de-gases it gets easier to get the good stuff out of the beans!

That white stuff at the top of the brew is mostly carbon dioxide. When it releases it increases the solubility of the grounds. In non-chemistry terms: it's a good thing because when the coffee de-gases it gets easier to get the good stuff out of the beans!

Step 3: Once the water is in, look at the clock and stick that coffee in the fridge. This is usually best done overnight so that the coffee is ready in the morning. We waited about 12 hours and the coffee tasted great. Don't go longer than 14 or the coffee will start to taste sour and over brewed.

Coffee's brewing ... now close the door and go to bed!

Coffee's brewing ... now close the door and go to bed!

Step 4: Filter and serve! We used an S Filter, obviously, and the coffee turned out sweet, rich and delicious. You can filter in other ways, but the S Filter keeps the oils in the coffee and accentuates the flavor strength of the concentrate.

Here are some pretty pictures of the filtering in action:

S Filter, AeroPress, cold brew and hopeful waiting glass!

S Filter, AeroPress, cold brew and hopeful waiting glass!

Pouring slowly and carefully to avoid drips. Remember to put the ice in first!

Pouring slowly and carefully to avoid drips. Remember to put the ice in first!

Pour slowly to avoid dumping a bunch of grounds into the AeroPress. Also, we added the ice first so that glass wouldn't overflow.

Leave a little room in the glass for diluting the concentrate. Like this:

Concentrate and ice in, ready to dilute!

Concentrate and ice in, ready to dilute!

Dilute to taste. We like using pretty whiskey glasses to dilute our iced coffee. It makes it feel very sophisticated. :)

The results:

Ice courtesy of Tovolo, which makes a really handy spherical ice mold.

Ice courtesy of Tovolo, which makes a really handy spherical ice mold.

Notice our ice is round. We use the Tovolo ice mold and it works great because the ice melts much more slowly (because less surface area touching the coffee) and the coffee stays at just the proper ratio the way we like it! 

All ready to drink:

This is the official middle finger to August...

This is the official middle finger to August...

Finally, Step 5: Filter all the concentrate now into a separate jar to keep it from over brewing. You can keep the rest of the concentrate in the fridge for up to a week. Longer than that and it will get stale, so it's time to make a fresh batch!

It's waiting for when you're thirsty and hot and just need a cool refreshing beverage...

It's waiting for when you're thirsty and hot and just need a cool refreshing beverage...

Ingredients we used:

  1. Coffee (100 g of Kuma Coffee's Guatemala Finca Retana)
  2. Water from the Cascades, courtesy of Seattle City Gov (700 g)
  3. Ice (from Tovolo molds)
  4. Jars (re-used from pickles after careful washing)
  5. AeroPress and S Filter (also available on Amazon)

That's it! Happy brewing and good luck beating the dog days of August!

Email [email protected] if you have any questions about our recipe...